Indigenous Public Art Stolen from Downtown Nanaimo

'Spindle Whorl' stolen from Victoria Crescent

Summary

On Thursday, March 21, 2019 a downtown Indigenous public art project titled “Spindle Whorl” was forcefully removed and stolen from the corner of Albert Street and Victoria Crescent. A photo of the stolen artwork is attached to this press release.

Members of the community who have information regarding this act of theft, or who have information on the location of the missing artwork, are asked to contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or online at www.nanaimocrimestoppers.com.

Strategic Link: Public art helps animate our public places and spaces, making them more welcoming, attractive, and contributing to cultural vitality.

Key Points

  • On Thursday, March 21, 2019 a downtown Indigenous public art project titled “Spindle Whorl” was forcefully removed and stolen from the corner of Albert Street and Victoria Crescent
  • If you have any information regarding this act of theft, please contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or online at www.nanaimocrimestoppers.com

Quotes

"Although incidents like this are rare, when they do occur it is extremely frustrating. Not only has the artwork been stolen, but an iconic art project has been taken from the community."

Culture & Heritage Coordinator
City of Nanaimo

Quick Facts

  • On Thursday, March 21, 2019 a downtown Indigenous public art project titled “Spindle Whorl” was forcefully removed and stolen from the corner of Albert Street and Victoria Crescent.
  • "Spindle Whorl" was carved by artist Joel Good in 2013 as part of the City's Temporary Public Art program. Since 2013, it was displayed in Maffeo Sutton Park for public viewing before it was moved to its new permanent location at the corner of Albert Street and Victoria Crescent in April 2015.
  • The project was added to the City's permanent inventory of public art in 2015 as part of some enhancements in the downtown area.
  • As shared by the artist, historically used as a tool for spinning wool into yarn, the spindle whorl has become an iconic symbol for the Snuneymuxw First Nation. Carvings in relief depict family stories and legends.
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Contact:

Chris Barfoot
Culture and Heritage Coordinator
City of Nanaimo
250-755-7522
Main Office
Culture & Heritage
City of Nanaimo
250-755-4483

Print News Release

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