Reservoir No. 1 and Energy Recovery Facility


Reservoir No 1 perspective from Nanaimo Lakes Road. 

A new 14 million litre (ML) enclosed reinforced concrete water reservoir (storage tank) and associated pipelines are required to replace the original open air water reservoir, in order to receive filtered and treated drinking water from the City of Nanaimo's South Fork Water Treatment Plant, coming on line in spring 2015. The old open air reservoir is on the east side of Nanaimo Lakes Road, south of the Parkway.  It currently receives water piped directly from South Fork Dam.  As the water leaves the reservoir and enters the City, it is screened and disinfected and then piped to the network.

The new reservoir needs to be constructed in advance of commissioning of the water treatment plant, so it is able to receive and protect the filtered water. In conjunction with the construction of Reservoir No 1, the project will incorporate energy recovery equipment in the control building for the reservoir. The energy recovery component is expected to generate enough to power 60-70 homes.

Phase one of construction will begin in August 2012 and is scheduled to be complete by the end of 2012.  Phase one will include the installation of a new pipeline and clearing of land for the future reservoir site.  The second phase includes the construction of the new reservoir and energy recovery facility and is scheduled to be completed in the spring of 2014.

 
  • Progress

    Progress

    A new 14 million litre (ML) enclosed reinforced concrete water reservoir (storage tank) and associated pipelines were required to replace the original open air water reservoir, in order to receive filtered and treated drinking water from the City of Nanaimo's South Fork Water Treatment Plant. The old open air reservoir is on the east side of Nanaimo Lakes Road, south of the Nanaimo Parkway.

    Pipeline construction commenced August 2012 and the new reservoir and energy recovery facility was completed and operational in April 2014.

    Budget 

    The overall project budget was $11.2 million, including design, pipeline installation and construction.

    Project funding sources are:

    •  $7.68 million from the Union of British Columbia Municipalities (UBCM) in partnership with the Federal and Provincial Governments through the Gas Tax Fund
    • the City’s Water Fund $3.5 million
     
  • Documents
  • Details

    Details

    The new reservoir was constructed in advance of commissioning of the water treatment plant, so it is able to receive and protect the filtered water. In conjunction with the construction of Reservoir No 1, the project incorporated energy recovery equipment in the control building for the reservoir. 

    Energy Production

    Before the treated water enters the new reservoir it passes through a turbine which in turn generates electricity. The energy recovery component currently generates enough to power for 60-70 homes. The energy produced (approximately 680 mega watt hours) reduces the City's carbon footprint and the revenue generated (approximately $72,000 per year) by selling the power back to BC Hydro will help recoup operating costs of the water supply system.

    Benefits

    We have developed the water supply system to take advantage of topography and hydraulics, to the point that much of the City’s water can be feed by gravity without the use of pumps - even over a horizontal distance of 45 km from the source. Reservoir No. 1 will receive its water by gravity, directly from the South Fork Water Treatment Plant.

    Another key benefit of the new reservoir is the provision of fire protection and emergency storage for the entire City. Our water supply system is currently configured to be able to feed water from this reservoir throughout the entire City. Thus if there is a need to take the North Nanaimo system off‐line, or if there are increased fire flow requirements, the new reservoir can be used to augment or replace this system.


  • Background

    Old Reservoir #1 

    The old reservoir is 100 years old and holds 59 million litres of water. With recent changes in the City's Water Works Operating Permit requiring the construction of advanced water treatment including filtration, the old reservoir could no longer remain open in order to preserve the water quality coming from the water treatment plant.  The old reservoir could not be covered, due to the large size, cost, and operational needs.

    The difference between the capacity of the old and new reservoirs is due to the fact the old reservoir was built to supply the entire city and since then another eight storage reservoirs have been built with a total capacity of 37.2 million litres. The new reservoir will supply 30% of the City's water and has a capacity of 14.4 million litres which would fill the pool at Nanaimo Aquatic Centre 5 times.

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